• Expatriate Health Insurance Blog

  • Tuesday, November 21, 2017

The expatriate health insurance is one of the many forms of international insurance. It is especially designed to provide financial protection for individuals who reside and work, permanently or temporarily, in a region or country other than their upbringing or legal residence. With the increasing international mobility, more people work and live outside the boundaries of their countries of origins. Therefore, expat health insurance should be properly considered.

Many people know what an expat health insurance covers but not many people are aware of the common exclusions of such an international insurance policy. Exclusions are included in the expat health insurance so that the underwriter only covers very specific losses. International insurance plans will always include exclusions for fundamental risks. Fundamental risks are risks of which there is no chance of recovery. 

In general, insurance providers will not venture to cover losses caused by acts of war, terrorist acts, military actions, or other civil commotions, nuclear explosions and resulting fallout, or contractual liability which the policy holder has assumed under an agreement which wouldn’t have arisen under normal conditions. Each insurance provider has specific exclusions for each policyholder and destination.

With expatriate health insurance policies, the same principle applies when it comes to exclusions. Many providers would word the policy so that no losses caused directly or indirectly as a result of fundamental risks would be covered. The concept of proximate cause becomes crucial for international insurances of any kind including the expat health insurance. This is the way insurers make certain that they only cover clearly specified losses caused by particularly stipulated risks.


Overseas Expat Medical Insurance (limited home country cover)
Worldwide Expat Health Insurance (home country included)

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